AI and court decisions

Information technology such as artificial intelligence is making a difference in various areas of our lives. They are opening up entirely new possibilities for the judicial field as well, changing the practice of law and the role and impact of courts in general.

Many law firms are using AI-enabled applications for a variety of investigations. Already, more than 75 countries have incorporated facial recognition systems into everyday practice, and it is an important part of homeland security. Artificial intelligence makes it possible to determine the routes of individuals’ movements quite clearly and to identify the connection of potential suspects to crime scenes. In particular, the FBI has already used facial recognition algorithms hundreds of thousands of times over the past ten years to conduct detailed searches in databases (including databases of issued visas and license documentation). AI is making some changes in administrative law, contract drafting, and many other aspects of the legal system.

Not all judges are ready to use all the achievements of AI in their practice. Nevertheless, it has already been proven in practice that, if properly applied, artificial intelligence systems can improve the efficiency of the judicial system, and increase the quality, accuracy, and consistency of judicial decisions.

As an example, AI can be used to analyze video recordings, for example, of accidents that happened. Unlike humans, it would be able to determine exactly what caused the accident. Whether the accident was provoked by a person or animal running onto the road or by simple driver inattention, whether the driver could have reacted differently to the situation, etc. By analyzing hundreds of data, AI can make a prediction and determine with a high degree of probability whether a particular defendant will commit any other crime.

And this is just a small part of the capabilities of artificial intelligence. But its most basic benefit is mitigating human bias. AI in jurisprudence supports only those decisions that are based on evidence and can make judicial reasoning more transparent.

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